2019 VLAP Report

Taken from NH Department of Environmental Services

Have you ever wondered how a state with over 800 public lakes and ponds and eight aquatic biologists can evaluate water quality? It would be impossible without the help of dedicated state-wide volunteers who offer their time to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES).

This network of volunteers is part of the NHDES Volunteer Lake Assessment Program (VLAP). Initiated in 1985, VLAP establishes a volunteer-driven lake sampling program to assist NHDES in evaluating lake water quality and provides volunteer monitors and lake residents with reports on lake health. This cooperative effort allows biologists and lake associations to make educated decisions regarding the future of New Hampshire’s lakes and ponds. If you wish to see the full content, please go to
https://www.des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/vlap/categories/overview.htm

Since 1982 MLPOA has participated in the VLAP Program. VLAP is a cooperative program between NHDES and MLPOA in which trained volunteers gather data on the lake. The volunteers measure a variety of water characteristics and send water samples to NHDES for chemical analysis. Sampling is done at each inlet three times a year. Monomonac Lake is currently listed as an “impaired water body” for nutrients, Chlorophyll-A, cyanobacteria and pH. (ie by chemical analysis). Impairment information may be found at
https://nhdes.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=aa5a11f8b8c341058fc031701a2fb3c9.

The following pages are pertinent excerpts of the 2019 VLAP Monomonac lake data summary

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS: Lake quality is generally representative of mesotrophic, or average
conditions, however algal growth tends to spike above the threshold for mesotrophic
lakes. This highlights the importance of trying to minimize nutrient pollution from
stormwater runoff within the watershed. NHDES' "NH homeowner's Guide to Stormwater
Management" is a great resource. Water clarity has declined since monitoring began;
however, this cannot be explained by an increase in algal growth. Continue to measure
apparent color to evaluate the relationship between color, turbidity, and water clarity. Keep up the great work!

 

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